Discussion: The ‘Slobification’ of society

In an impassioned rant in the New York Post last week, writer Elisabeth Vincentelli berated the ‘slobification’ of modern society.

Boris Johnson seems incapable of looking smart – even in a suit!

Boris Johnson seems incapable of looking smart – even in a suit!

The article caused a torrent of debate about whether people should be entitled to wear what they like to, for example, the theatre, or whether they should follow some sort of dress code. We engaged in the debate in the King & Allen office – and reached two conclusions:

  1. As members of a society, we are, as one commentator put it, part of a sphere: “The public sphere is a shared sphere. That is why people get upset when they see graffiti, public drunkenness etc.” As members of this shared sphere, we should show respect and courtesy, and dress accordingly when we engage with others – whether it be a theatre or sporting event, a wedding or a business meeting.
    From the article (via Getty) – People attending an expensive theatre show in casual attire. But is it wrong?

    From the article (via Getty) – People attending an expensive theatre show in casual attire. But is it wrong?

  2. Never underestimate the psychology behind dressing well. If you look good, you feel good – and you project yourself in a positive way. GQ summed it up perfectly in their appraisal of the article – “You dress like a slob, you’ll look like one, you’ll be treated like one, and you’ll feel like one. You don’t deserve to feel like a slob. You deserve to feel like a style Jedi.”

 

No Replies to "Discussion: The ‘Slobification’ of society"